7 Mistakes Managers Make During The Hiring Process

Thor Wood
9 min readJan 26, 2021

--

In the foodservice and hospitality industry the battle to attract workers to open jobs is being driven by an overall smaller industry labor pool stemming from limitations in how companies are competing for and ultimately recruiting workers. As workers continue to depart food service in droves, a trend that picked up steam in 2020 with workers heading to other industries such as food manufacturing, warehouse jobs, and even retail, where starting wages of $15–17 per hour in search of consistent income streams, complicating matters further are industry-wide issues with worker retention & turnover, and worker absenteeism which has become even more prevalent in the last 36–48 months (yes, even before the COVID exposure risk). Below are 7 mistakes managers are making during the hiring process:

  1. Relying on job boards to create a funnel of quality candidates. Many restaurant, foodservice and hospitality managers turn to job boards like Indeed, Monster, Career Builder, Snagajob, and Simply Hired, to post open jobs with the belief that they will see a flood of qualified candidates that meet the job requirements. Contrary to the value propositions these platforms boldly claim such as finding the perfect worker, hassle-free, in no time whatsoever, the hourly-service industry does not really benefit from such job sites simply because of the hyper transient nature of the industry — the average employment lasting less than two months for hourly employees, and just a tick over 4 months for management roles and the time it takes to properly screen the candidate pool, schedule interviews, conduct the interviews, and hope the worker shows up for day one training & onboarding. When calculating total labor costs a business must factor in recruiting costs, the manager’s time (and other employee’s time contributions to the effort), the time spent on candidate screening, selection, and training/onboarding. Factoring in that it takes 10 or more days to hire in the foodservice industry (pre-pandemic), In other words, using job boards takes a dedicated commitment in time to see meaningful results. Job boards end up being a funnel for the lowest common denominator (i.e. worker quality), and the process suffers from an inability to dedicate the time and energy required — unless you are a full-time recruiter, or employ a team of talent acquisition specialists these…

--

--

Thor Wood

Thoughts on being a startup founder, the foodservice & hospitality industry, the future of work and the gig-economy, & social impact https://linktr.ee/snapshyft